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The bright side of Coachella’s postponement

GRAPHIC BY DENISE THUONG
By CLAIRE LAW
STAFF WRITER

   Coachella is officially postponed.

  This year’s Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival was set to be held in Indio, California, over two weekends from April 9 through April 19. The star-studded lineup included performances by Frank Ocean, Travis Scott, Megan Thee Stallion, Lana Del Rey and so much more. Aside from the music aspect, individuals pride themselves in showcasing fashion trends, as the overall mood of the festival is filled with millennial flare.

  Unfortunately, millennials are unable to showcase their upcoming fashion trends since this year’s Coachella is postponed to the two weekends of Oct. 9 to 18 due to the deadly Coronavirus. 

  The Coronavirus is  an infectious disease caused by a new virus that can spread through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. Symptoms include cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. 

  Riverside County, California, which encompasses the Coachella Valley, said that its public health officer, Dr. Cameron Kaiser, had ordered the cancellation of the festivals, citing concerns about virus-related health risks. 

  “This decision was not taken lightly or without consideration of many factors,” Dr. Kaiser said. “No doubt it will impact many people, but my top priority is to protect the health of the entire community.”

  Furthermore, people that were looking forward to attending this year’s festival, became deeply disappointed after its suspension. Nonetheless, the postponement of Coachella will give people the opportunity to experience this popular festival in different weather and season and also the possibility of new fashion trends, while also staying safe from the Coronavirus.

  In recent years, Coachella has been held during the springtime. However, due to  the coronavirus, it has been moved to the fall time. 

  Additionally, October is generally a slightly hotter month in the Coachella Valley than April. In April, the average high is 87 degrees and the average low is 60 degrees, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an American scientific agency within the United States Department of Commerce that focuses on the conditions of the oceans, major waterways, and the atmosphere. 

  Not to mention, in the month of October, the average high is 92 and the average low is 63. Much of the hot weather, though, comes at the very start of the month. As summer turns to fall, nights can be chilly and generally less windy.

  Furthermore, while the desert is officially a year-round tourist destination, April is still high season and October is at the tail end of the low season after a long, hot summer. What does this mean for festival-goers? Better room availability at hotels and vacation rentals, and possibly better prices. Since October is in the fall season where not many tourists visit the area, hotel fees would be less. Compared to the hotel fees you would have to pay if Coachella was still going on in April instead. 

  Moreover, there might also be new fashion trends at Coachella in October. The Coachella uniform is notorious and famous for the fringe, flower crowns and cutoffs. Frankly, it’s getting a little tired of having similar outfits every year. A fall festival should have a totally different feel since it is a whole different season. But we can only wait and hope to see what an October Coachella would look like. 

  On the bright side, the postponement of Coachella gives people the opportunity to enjoy the different weather and season, as well as new fashion trends and outfits. 

In the end, it is much more important to protect yourself and everyone around you from the Coronavirus, as opposed to getting sick at a festival that occurs annually. 

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The student-run newspaper of Glen A. Wilson High School in Hacienda Heights, California.

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